Photography studio – Photo 2000 http://photo2000.co.uk/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 03:22:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://photo2000.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Photography studio – Photo 2000 http://photo2000.co.uk/ 32 32 PHOTO RELEASE: MDARD Director Gary McDowell tours the Cake Shop and ValleyHUB at the Kalamazoo Valley Community College Food Innovations Center https://photo2000.co.uk/photo-release-mdard-director-gary-mcdowell-tours-the-cake-shop-and-valleyhub-at-the-kalamazoo-valley-community-college-food-innovations-center/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 22:02:35 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/photo-release-mdard-director-gary-mcdowell-tours-the-cake-shop-and-valleyhub-at-the-kalamazoo-valley-community-college-food-innovations-center/ Kalamazoo, MI – Today Gary McDowell, Director of the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), visited several local food and agriculture businesses in Kalamazoo, including the Cake Boutique and the ValleyHUB at the Food Innovations Center from Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Throughout 2022, McDowell travels across the state to meet with food and […]]]>

Kalamazoo, MI – Today Gary McDowell, Director of the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), visited several local food and agriculture businesses in Kalamazoo, including the Cake Boutique and the ValleyHUB at the Food Innovations Center from Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Throughout 2022, McDowell travels across the state to meet with food and agriculture businesses as they move forward during Michigan’s economic recovery and revitalization.

“Michigan food and agriculture businesses continue to succeed because they have embraced creativity, innovation and sustainability,” said McDowell. “In the field of food and agriculture, you can create award-winning cakes or learn agricultural and food skills to help get healthy food to Michigan’s kitchen tables. I’m proud that our food sector and agriculture offers so many different entry points for young Michiganders seeking jobs and careers in this burgeoning industry.

The Cake Boutique is an award-winning international baking studio in Mattawan. The shop specializes in high-end party cakes, handmade sugar flowers, specialty chocolates and sugar centerpieces. Cake Boutique owner Beth Meyer and partner MaryJo Dowling competed in Food Network’s The Holiday Baking Championship: Gingerbread Showdown and won first place, winning $10,000.

ValleyHUB is a farm, food hub, and education center based at the Food Innovation Center at Kalamazoo Valley Community College. ValleyHUB’s Urban Farm showcases a range of sustainable farming practices. The five-acre site includes an indoor grow room; a heated greenhouse, outdoor raised beds; and a passive solar hoop. The Food Hub is a licensed food processing facility equipped to produce fresh cut fruits and vegetables at a range of production scales.

ValleyHUB is focused on getting healthier food to more plates in Southwest Michigan by training, educating and supporting the fresh food supply chain. They have a range of educational programs, including working with Michigan State University Extension, Family Farmed, and others to deliver skills-based workshops to farmers and food processors. They offer fun and practical courses on sustainability and self-sufficiency open to everyone.

Throughout 2022, Director McDowell meets with Michigan’s food and agriculture businesses to discuss how they can continue to thrive in Michigan’s new economy and how MDARD can best contribute to their continued development.

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New ‘Minions: The Rise of Gru’ decorations, photo ops and Minion Mayhem dance party at Universal Studios Florida https://photo2000.co.uk/new-minions-the-rise-of-gru-decorations-photo-ops-and-minion-mayhem-dance-party-at-universal-studios-florida/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:02:47 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/new-minions-the-rise-of-gru-decorations-photo-ops-and-minion-mayhem-dance-party-at-universal-studios-florida/ To promote the release of “Minions: The Rise of Gru” on July 1, Universal Studios Florida is offering new decorations, photo ops and a dance party at the release of Despicable Me Minion Mayhem. Visitors entering the park will immediately remember the film thanks to a large banner hanging from the arch. The circular banner […]]]>

To promote the release of “Minions: The Rise of Gru” on July 1, Universal Studios Florida is offering new decorations, photo ops and a dance party at the release of Despicable Me Minion Mayhem.

Visitors entering the park will immediately remember the film thanks to a large banner hanging from the arch.

The circular banner features three Minions, one holding a boom box.

An orange and blue tie-dye pattern is behind them. “Minions: The Rise of Gru” is set in the 1970s, so the decorations have a 70s aesthetic.

A photo/play location for the film can be found at Universal Music Plaza.

The backdrop has a teal and pink tie-dye pattern and a giant boom box at the top.

Some Minions in tracksuits are on either side of the backdrop.

The game is for two players. The buttons on this grid light up and players must hit them.

Unfortunately, the sun was a bit too bright to see the buttons light up when we stopped.

Nearby, a black curtain covers a panel we believe will be for a preview of “Minions: The Rise of Gru.”

We could see a glimpse of yellow through the curtains. This is where a sign previously advertised a “Sing 2” preview.

Guests can meet a Minion in front of a tie-dye backdrop in the Hollywood district.

The backdrop has the “Minions: The Rise of Gru” logo at the top.

On the side of Despicable Me Minion Mayhem, a new overlay for the film can be found at the exit of the attraction.

The screens above the exit change from the steel Gru logo to a 70s dance party hosted by the Minions.

A screen features different Minions on a psychedelic tie-dye background.

The other screen shows various Minions in ’70s outfits dancing among the exiting crowd.

Watch a video of the dance party below.

For more Universal Studios news from around the world, follow Universal Parks News Today at Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. For Disney Parks news, visit WDWNT.

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Studio Lighting for Photography: A Beginner’s Guide https://photo2000.co.uk/studio-lighting-for-photography-a-beginners-guide/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:45:00 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/studio-lighting-for-photography-a-beginners-guide/ If you’ve been taking photos for a while, you’ve probably heard that natural light is best for photography. While this is true, you can’t control sunlight as you please. On days when clouds cover the sun, you get even, diffused light. Other times you end up mostly with bright, harsh light. If you want full […]]]>

If you’ve been taking photos for a while, you’ve probably heard that natural light is best for photography. While this is true, you can’t control sunlight as you please.

On days when clouds cover the sun, you get even, diffused light. Other times you end up mostly with bright, harsh light. If you want full control over lighting, you should opt for artificial lighting.

USE VIDEO OF THE DAY

This is especially important if you work primarily in the studio. But the transition from natural to artificial lighting can be daunting. We are here to help you.

The basics of lighting

In photography, lighting is essential. Without good light, your photos will look flat and unattractive. So, before we dive deeper into the types of lighting, let’s learn some basics about lighting.

There are three main types of lighting: main lighting, task lighting and backlighting.

key light is the main light with which you illuminate your subject. Suppose you are photographing someone outdoors in natural light, the sun is your main light. The most powerful light you will use will be your main light when you are in the studio.

Fill light is the light you use to fill in the shadows cast by your subject. It is often placed in front of the main light and is generally less intense. Did you use a reflector to fill in shadows when shooting in natural light? The reflector acts as a fill light in this case.

Backlight is the light you place behind your subject. The purpose of this light is to bring depth to your subject by better defining the outline. Read all about backlighting here. It basically separates your subject from the background.

You should use these three lighting techniques to get evenly lit photos with depth and detail. Of course, once you master them, you can play around to create different lighting setups.

Hard light versus soft light

Before using artificial lights, you must first know the quality of the light. Photographers define the quality of light by the type of shadows it produces.


For example, hard light creates shadows with hard edges. Imagine you are in direct sunlight, you can see your shadow distinctly. On the other hand, soft light produces gradual shadows without hard edges. Shadows aren’t as well defined on cloudy days.

Hard light is great for adding seriousness, edginess and drama to your photos, while soft light makes your subject look nice and friendly.

Types of artificial lighting

You can choose three types of lighting for your studio photography projects.

Continuous lighting

This type of lighting is where you keep the light on continuously in the background while taking pictures. Your camera and flash work separately without the need to communicate with each other. You can choose a studio bulb or LED lights for your continuous lighting setup. Also, this is the one to use for videography.

Continuous lighting is simple: you turn on the lights, see how they illuminate your scene, decide on exposure settings, and start shooting. You can even use your camera’s auto mode with continuous lighting.

As you can see, continuous lighting is simple to master and you can try it first if you are a beginner. But, there are some downsides to this. You still need an external power supply to power your lights. And the setup will heat up quickly because you’ll keep the lights on longer. This can especially become annoying in a small studio.

In mixed lighting scenarios involving different lights, for example in a room with fluorescent or tungsten bulbs, you may want a more powerful light such as a studio flash or strobe to fully master the mixed lighting.


Speedlights

Unlike continuous lighting, flashes only flash when your camera takes a picture. The flashes are quite powerful, but they’re lightweight, portable, and don’t take up much room in your camera bag.

They are powered by regular AA batteries and you don’t have to worry about finding a power source when going to different places for photo shoots.

Flashes are also versatile because you can use them on your camera’s hot shoe as an in-camera flash. But, when using them as an external flash, you will need a trigger that will tell the flash to fire when your camera takes a picture. Expensive flashes are equipped with a built-in shutter release.

With flashes, you also have some disadvantages. Unless you have advanced flash with high speed sync, you are limited to using 1/200 or 1/250 as your shutter speed. This can be a problem if you’re trying to freeze motion. They are not as powerful as studio strobes.

When working with flashes, you won’t be able to see the result of your shot until you click on some images and check them on your camera. So, you should be ready to play around with different settings and find the one that works for you.

Monolight and strobe flash

Monolights, also called studio strobes, are self-powered flashes capable of producing very intense light for a short duration. They are bigger and bulkier than flashes but have a shorter recycle time between shots. They’re so powerful you can even use them outdoors to subdue sunlight.

Monolights have what’s called modeling light, which will illuminate your scene so you can see exactly how your photos will turn out.

The main disadvantage of studio flashes is that they are bulkier to carry. However, there is a new type of flash called a stroboscopic flash which is like a cross between a monolight and a flash. Powered by batteries, they pack a punch. More power and less weight: you get the best of both worlds.

Don’t Forget Light Modifiers

Light modifiers like softboxes, reflectors, umbrellas, grids and beauty bowls are necessary accessories in your studio. They are essential to bringing your vision to life. So, explore different modifiers and find out how they impact your photos.

Choose the right type of lighting for you

Using artificial lights can open a whole new world to you. But, you may be reluctant to try it. Fortunately, artificial lighting is not so difficult to master. All these different new terms and gadgets may scare you, but don’t let them stop you. Start with continuous lighting, practice regularly, then move on to more complex lighting.

The good news is that there are affordable options for lighting equipment online. You can also buy them as kits with lights, light stands, softboxes, and other accessories. There’s no reason to stop you from trying out studio lighting. So why not give it a shot? Good click!

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Duke Professor’s New Music Explores Juneteenth https://photo2000.co.uk/duke-professors-new-music-explores-juneteenth/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:14:41 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/duke-professors-new-music-explores-juneteenth/ About a year ago, Dr. Anthony Kelley woke up with a melody in his head. The collection of musical notes settled in, reminding him of old spirituals sung by slaves. In the composition studio at his Durham home, Kelley, an associate professor of music practice at Duke, got to work playing the notes on an […]]]>

About a year ago, Dr. Anthony Kelley woke up with a melody in his head. The collection of musical notes settled in, reminding him of old spirituals sung by slaves.

In the composition studio at his Durham home, Kelley, an associate professor of music practice at Duke, got to work playing the notes on an electronic keyboard. After a while, he added rhythm and layered sounds and melodies, building a first scaffolding for the first movement of the passion project: a new musical work completed in April.

On June 18, in commemoration of Juneteenth, Spirituals of Liberation will be performed for the first time before an audience by the North Carolina Symphony at the Koka Booth Amphitheater in Cary. The 18-minute piece, directed by Michelle Di Russo, is part of “Summerfest: Juneteenth Celebration,” which celebrates the contributions of African-American musicians and composers such as Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong and many more.

“It’s kind of surreal,” said Kelley, who earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Duke and joined the music school in 2000. “You’ve been living with all these weird synth sounds in your head for a long time, and you know what you think it’s going to look like, but people are going to put their little spin on it.

The upcoming premiere is one of the fruits of Kelley’s time as Composer-in-Residence of the North Carolina Symphony Orchestra from 2021-2023. As part of the partnership, Kelley has participated in community programs, workshops and contributed to the group’s educational program that helps teachers. across the state educating the next generation of young musicians.Piano player Anthony Kelley was inspired to write the music for Juneteenth after waking up with a melody in his head.  Photo courtesy of Anthony Kelley.

Following the June 18 concert, the symphony will go on tour with the piece, with a free outdoor performance at the Southern Village Green in Chapel Hill on June 21 as well as later concerts in New Bern and Tarboro. The play will also be performed in Fayetteville in September.

The concerts and residency are a significant achievement for Kelley, a Henderson native who plays piano, trombone and tuba. As a teenager, on January 23, 1980, he attended his very first symphony concert to see the NC Symphony in downtown Raleigh, with guest soloist and jazz pianist Billy Taylor. This experience influenced his belief in stylistic blending and helped inspire his budding interest in music, which ultimately led him to Duke.The North Carolina Symphony Orchestra played a part in inspiring Anthony Kelley, playing the tuba in this 1983 photo, into his love for music.  Photo courtesy of Anthony Kelley.

“This is me coming home,” Kelley said. “I’m the one writing at home for the first orchestra I was exposed to when I was in college. It’s this orchestra, so it’s a spiritual return.

He was working on the piece Juneteenth when he began his residency at the North Carolina Symphony. When the Symphony Orchestra heard about his work in progress, they approached him to commission the piece for the June 18 special performance.

The Juneteenth music is Kelley’s personal three-movement reflection on the history of the struggle for freedom and emancipation of slaves on June 19, 1865 in the United States. As a tribute to these slaves, Kelley wanted to tell the whole story of Juneteenth, including the joys of freedom and the painful aspects that must never be forgotten.

“I didn’t just want to write an article literally about the issue of emancipation,” he said. “I wanted to write the passage from enslavement to emancipation.Spirits of Liberation, presented here with part of the score, will be premiered on June 18 by the NC Symphony.  Photo courtesy of Anthony Kelley.

The first movement, “Work Song”, emulates the sounds of railroad construction, a nod to Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. It represents the psychological labor of slaves to dream of their freedom while engaging in manual labor.

“Elegy for the Blues People”, the second movement, is a lyrical and slow return to the painful qualities of the spirituals. It takes its name from Amiri Baraka’s theories about the first generation of slaves who considered the United States their homeland. They were responsible for creating blues music.

The last movement, “Never Forget”, celebrates the freedom and the effort to preserve the history of this struggle, with echoes of the melodies of the previous movements.

“Freedom is something to celebrate,” Kelley said, “but it’s also complicated in the past.”

Submit story ideas, dedications, and photographs through our story idea form or write to working@duke.edu.

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Free traveling museum turns art into a hub for all https://photo2000.co.uk/free-traveling-museum-turns-art-into-a-hub-for-all/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 04:13:30 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/free-traveling-museum-turns-art-into-a-hub-for-all/ Imagine a huge meat processing factory taken over by 50 artists from all kinds of media who transform 3,500 meters of dull gray industrial space into a magical museum. This is what Zumu, “the moving museum”, did in the former Soglowek factory in Nahariya, in northern Israel. The exhibition, in collaboration with the Tarbut movement, […]]]>

Imagine a huge meat processing factory taken over by 50 artists from all kinds of media who transform 3,500 meters of dull gray industrial space into a magical museum.

This is what Zumu, “the moving museum”, did in the former Soglowek factory in Nahariya, in northern Israel.

The exhibition, in collaboration with the Tarbut movement, runs until July 2.

The idea of ​​Zumu, a portmanteau of the Hebrew words for “move” and “museum,” is to create temporary museums that travel throughout Israel, primarily to towns on Israel’s periphery that have few cultural venues.

Admission is free as Zumu aims to take the museum concept from an elite institution to a vibrant cultural hub that reflects each host community.

Some of the artists in the exhibits are local; other artists participate in a residency program and create commissioned works in partnership with the local community.

Children enjoy their visit to the Zumu mobile museum in Nahariya. Photo by Yair Meyuhas/Studio ZooZ

The Soglowek factory is located at the entrance to Nahariya on a eucalyptus-lined boulevard that stretches to the Mediterranean Sea. The factory will soon be demolished to make way for high-rise apartment buildings.

Since Zumu opened its exhibit at the factory in May, hundreds of people from across Israel have come every day, including groups of school children, to explore and learn, drawing on a sense of communal creativity .

Art, education, community

Zumu was founded when Milana Gitzin-Adiram, Sharon Glazberg and Halit Michaeli came together to combine art, education and community.

Zumu has already organized exhibitions in Yeruham and Arad in the south, and in Lod in central Israel.

“This exhibit was an incredible success,” Zumu spokesperson Ariel Adiram told ISRAEL21c.

The artists transformed a factory that produced salami and cured meats, he said. “We were able to bring creativity and vitality to a place dedicated to the preservation of dead meat!

Visitors enjoying art in a former meat processing plant. Photo by Yair Meyuhas/Studio ZooZ

The exhibition is sponsored by the Municipality of Nahariya as well as various organizations, including Reality Group, which owns the factory site.

The theme of the exhibition, “Life’s Work”, also touches on the new post-pandemic period and the desire to resume a normal life.

A group celebrates Zumu’s opening of the ‘Life’s Work’ exhibition in a former factory in Nahariya. Photo by Yair Mehuyas/Studio ZooZ

In cold rooms, warehouses and at the truck loading dock, exhibits explore work, life and the passage of time.

An art video shows flowering almond trees, losing their blossoms in the wind, then blooming again. There are butterflies that seem to be flying along a massive wall, moving towards the light.

Butterflies mounted along a massive wall at the Zumu Mobile Museum appear to be heading for the light. Photo by Yair Meyuhas/Studio ZooZ

Groups of students sat in low chairs, sipping cider and eating cookies as they began their visit to the museum. The founders of Zumu believe that art should be warm and gentle, open to all.

A child enjoying an interactive exhibit at Zumu in Nahariya. Photo by Yair Meyuhas/Studio ZooZ

Visitors roam the halls of the factory and explore all kinds of art, including photographs and videos.

In one part of the factory is a display of dry branches decorated with origami flowers. The branches seem to grow on a concrete slab, another example of rebirth.

One of the museum’s tour guides, Galia Mor, managed the cultural department at Nahariya City Hall and took time out of her retirement to train in Zumu to guide tours of the factory.

The traveling museum, she said, “gives an incredible boost to the city.”

For more information, click here

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Lost Spanish Civil War Photos Reveal Daily Life Behind Anti-Fascist Lines | Spain https://photo2000.co.uk/lost-spanish-civil-war-photos-reveal-daily-life-behind-anti-fascist-lines-spain/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 14:17:00 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/lost-spanish-civil-war-photos-reveal-daily-life-behind-anti-fascist-lines-spain/ Pphotographs by two Jewish female photographers who worked behind anti-fascist lines during the Spanish Civil War have been exhibited in Madrid after 80 years. For decades, negatives and prints, many of which were never published, were considered lost or destroyed. They are now on display for the first time in the capital. As the Spanish […]]]>

Pphotographs by two Jewish female photographers who worked behind anti-fascist lines during the Spanish Civil War have been exhibited in Madrid after 80 years. For decades, negatives and prints, many of which were never published, were considered lost or destroyed. They are now on display for the first time in the capital.

As the Spanish Civil War drew to a close in 1939, anarchists from the Confederación Nacional del Trabajo and Federación Anarquista Ibérica (CNT-FAI) fighting in Barcelona took steps to preserve records of their struggle and achievements . Understanding the outcome of the war, they sealed documents and 2,300 photographs, 5,000 negatives and nearly 300 photographic plates in 48 wooden boxes, which they smuggled out of the city away from the fascist bombardments, intended for the refuge of the International Institute of Social History. (IISH) in Amsterdam.

Years later, having traveled via Paris, Harrogate and Oxford, the crates, known as Amsterdam boxes, duly arrived. They remained sealed as the anarchists led secret lives during the decades of the Franco regime. When they were finally opened in the 1980s, the archives and documents inside were inventoried, but the photographic material was neglected.

One of the Amsterdam boxes on display in Madrid

Today, thanks to the detective work of art historian and curator Almudena Rubio, who has been researching the IISH archives since 2015, it has become possible to identify the production of two foreign photographers, both Jewish, who traveled to Spain to take sides. in the war: Margaret Michaelis, of Polish-Austrian origin, and Kati Horna, from Hungary and friend of the photojournalist Robert Capa, a compatriot.

Anarchist fighters.  Photography: Margaret Michaelis / IISH / National Gallery of Australia

Michaelis had studied photography in Vienna in the 1920s and continued to work in Berlin until she and her husband, a prominent anarchist, were repeatedly arrested by the Nazis.

After her release, the couple moved to Barcelona in 1933, where she set up her own studio and worked as a portraitist and advertising and architectural photographer.

CNT-FAI street activity in Barcelona, ​​1936. Photograph: Margaret Michaelis / IISH / National Gallery of Australia

After the outbreak of the Civil War, Michaelis worked for the Anarchists’ Foreign Propaganda Office and provided footage for the new Catalonia Propaganda Commissariat, which sought to maintain morale while encouraging anti-fascist action.

Emma Goldman visits Albalate de Cinca in Aragon.  Photography: Margaret Michaelis / IISH / National Gallery of Australia

Among the recently released images of Michaelis, all taken with a Leica, are scenes of street actions in Barcelona by anarchist militants; views of daily life in Albalate de Cinca and Valencia; report of a visit to L’Alcora, a village which had abolished the use of money; rare photographs of veteran anarchist Emma Goldman (memorably labeled by J Edgar Hoover as “the most dangerous woman in America”); and the arrival of the British Red Cross in Portbou.

A collectivized church in Aragon converted into a carpentry workshop.  Photography: Kati Horna / IISH / Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte.  Documentary Center of the Historical Memoria

As Michaelis left Spain, Horna arrived in January 1937. She, too, was a trained photographer and had left Germany in 1933. Upon arriving in Spain after four years in Paris, she became involved in social revolution, working for foreign propaganda. office of the anarchists.

Anarchist vehicles in front of the CNT-FAI propaganda office in Barcelona, ​​1937. Photograph: Kati Horna / IISH / Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte.  Documentary Center of the Historical Memoria
Barcelona, ​​1937 Photograph: Kati Horna / IISH / Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte.  Documentary Center of the Historical Memoria

  • Left, CNT-FAI anarchist vehicles in Barcelona, ​​1937. Right, Children in Barcelona, ​​1937. Photographs: Kati Horna / IISH / Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte. Documentary Center of the Historical Memoria

She quickly established herself as the official photographer of SPA, an anarchist photo agency, and her photos were published in anarchist titles such as Umbral, Mujeres Libres and Tierra y libertad.

Horna’s work, like that of Michaelis, was designed to support social revolution and counter Francoist propaganda that attempted to discredit the anti-fascist movement. Rolleiflex in hand, she visits a camp set up to care for children removed from the war zone; it recorded the human and sanitary conditions in a Modelo prison; she imagined a collectivized church in Aragon converted into a carpentry workshop; she saw villagers get their hair cut for free in a collective barber shop; she crossed a trench on the Aragon front.

Combatants on the Aragon front, 1937. Photographs: Kati Horna / IISH / Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte. Documentary Center of the Historical Memoria
Combatants on the Aragon front, 1937. Photographs: Kati Horna / IISH / Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte. Documentary Center of the Historical Memoria

Rubio, whose painstaking research unearthed the photographs, has no doubts about their importance. “The legacy of the work of Michaelis and Horna is unique precisely because it shows us the revolutionary experience of the rearguard, neglected by official historiography, which was fomented by the anarchists of the CNT- ISP. At the same time, it allows us to reconstruct in more detail the life of the two photographers during the civil war, and to better appreciate their work in anti-fascist Spain.

In the trenches of the Aragon front, 1937. Photograph: Kati Horna / IISH / Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte.  Documentary Center of the Historical Memoria

Both photographers believed their work had been lost or destroyed in the ruins of Franco’s bombs. Today, for the first time, images are seeing the light of day.

The Amsterdam Boxes: Kati Horna and Margaret Michaelis in the Civil War is at National Calcography in Madrid as part of PhotoEspaña until July 27. The exhibition will travel to Huesca (Aragon) and Barcelona

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When George W. Bush confused Russia’s war in Ukraine with Iraq https://photo2000.co.uk/when-george-w-bush-confused-russias-war-in-ukraine-with-iraq/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 09:00:08 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/when-george-w-bush-confused-russias-war-in-ukraine-with-iraq/ The George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas is a 226,000 square foot building that houses the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum and the George W. Bush Institute. This is not the kind of place where one goes to seek the unvarnished truth about George W. Bush. Like many institutions of its ilk, […]]]>

The George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas is a 226,000 square foot building that houses the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum and the George W. Bush Institute. This is not the kind of place where one goes to seek the unvarnished truth about George W. Bush. Like many institutions of its ilk, it serves up carefully curated hagiography, amidst majestic colonnades and a bubbling fountain. Visitors enter a 67-foot-tall atrium called Freedom Hall; the Defending Freedom Table is a large touch screen where museum visitors can view maps and photographs from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. There’s a statue of Bush and his father gazing deliberately into the distance, and a statue of Barney and Miss Beazley, George and Laura Bush’s Scottish terriers, striking a similar pose. In the library, scholars can sift through official White House documents to extract fuller, less flattering stories from the Bush years. But the image for the public is a whitewashed portrait. On the library’s website, an online exhibit on the 9/11 attacks and their aftermath hails Bush for demonstrating “the strength of American resolve.”

So it came as a surprise when a scathing indictment against the former president was released recently at a Bush Center event. Even more unexpected was the source of this outspokenness: Bush himself. During brief remarks at a forum on elections and democracy, held last month, Bush stumbled over his prepared text. He was talking about Russian President Vladimir Putin’s crackdown on dissent. “The result is an absence of checks and balances in Russia,” Bush said. “And one man’s decision to launch a totally unwarranted and brutal invasion of Iraq. I mean – from Ukraine. Iraq too. In any event.”

Images of the error spread quickly. On social media, the theme song “Curb Your Enthusiasm” became the soundtrack to Bush’s blunder. The late night entertainers weighed in. (“It’s a refreshingly lighthearted confession to war crimes,” said Stephen Colbert.) Many commentators have diagnosed a Freudian slip: the ex-president’s bad conscience had arisen, uninvited. Either way, Bush’s video was a novelty: rarely has a world leader released such an emphatic “confession” on an issue of such historic consequence.

It was also a genre piece. Gaffe videos are ubiquitous clickbait, and politicians’ bloopers are among the most popular feeds. Bush, famously, is a blunderer, the purveyor of scrambled hash syntax, crazy circumlocutions, counterpuns and other “Bushisms” that have haunted the Internet – or, as Bush would have it, the Internets – for ages. decades. Many Bushisms have entered the American tradition, taking their place alongside the gonzo poetry of Yogi Berra. It was Bush who popularized the term “badly underrated”, who posed the question “Are our children learning?” who reflected “I think we’re in agreement, the past is over.” In 2009, Bush announced that he would write a memoir to ensure that “there is an authoritative voice saying exactly what happened.”

For the sympathetic public of the Bush Center, the Iraq-Ukraine confusion appeared as Bushism par excellence, a harmless and endearing slippage. The former president laughed, shook his head and joked that he was having a senior moment. Sympathetic laughter ran through the crowd.

But not everyone was amused. It was a misstep that spoke some uncomfortable truths. It makes perfect sense to confuse Russia’s war in Ukraine with Iraq: the two events have much in common. Saddam Hussein was no Zelensky, but the invasion of Iraq was, indeed, brutal and unwarranted. It was a world-historic calamity that sowed chaos, spread torture and, according to many sources, caused hundreds of thousands of deaths. The ideology behind Bush’s war may have been concocted in the unflappable bureaucratic world of the Washington think tank. But in spirit, it was no less reckless and grand than the imperial visions guiding Putin’s conquest of Ukraine.

Bush left office in 2009 as one of the least popular presidents in history. Today’s Bush is a more cuddly character who, we’re told, likes to hang out in his art studio, painting pictures of dogs and American flags. Bushisms played a part in this rehabilitation, helping to transform the former “wartime president” into a gentle old man who laughs at his own weaknesses. A Bush Center podcast takes its name from a “Saturday Night Live” skit ridiculing Bush’s malapropisms: “The Strategerist.” Last year, Bush appeared on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” to take a quiz, “Bushism or Not?” based on videos of his famous gaffes. The clips included the extraordinary moment from a press conference in Baghdad in 2008 when a furious Iraqi journalist threw a pair of shoes at the president. “I was so proud of you for dodging those shoes,” Kimmel said. “You have very good reflexes.

Several months later, a speech by Bush was interrupted by Mike Prysner, an activist and veteran of Iraq. “Mr. Bush, when are you going to apologize to the million Iraqis who died because you lied? Prysner shouted. ‘You lied about weapons of mass destruction! … My friends are dead! Prysner had planned to recite a few names of the dead, but he was shoved out of the auditorium. In America, we’re not that good at truth and reconciliation. We prefer Twitter dunks and yucks to late-night TV. evening.

In 2022, the United States is living a collective senior moment. Our democracy is aging and weakening. We started the century by imposing regime change abroad; now we are repelling a putsch in our Capitol. Bush’s Iraq-Ukraine flub is a marker of these tragic follies and the trajectory of decline and fall we seem to be following. It’s also a reminder of how many people would rather forget about the Iraq debacle altogether. In fact, the invasion was not based on the decision of “one man”. Much of Washington’s political class – Republicans and Democrats, neo-conservatives and liberal hawks – backed the invasion and the lies that justified it. These proponents of war shared a particular kind of American hubris and naivete, a willingness to ignore the realpolitik behind our interventions in the oil-rich Middle East while speaking fine words about spreading freedom and democracy. .

This message was impossible to escape in the months before the invasion. We denounce Putin’s use of disinformation to promote the assault on Ukraine. But Bush’s push for war was also accompanied by a push for propaganda, and many of the journalists and public intellectuals who peddled this party line still hold influential positions. It is surely unpleasant for them to be reminded of their errors of judgement. But the truth has a way of seeping in, sometimes in unlikely places, like the dais of presidential libraries. Call it a Freudian slip or a brain freeze or history having its revenge. Unlike Bushism, the past is not — never — over.


Source photographs: Associated Press screenshots

Jody Rosen is a contributing writer for the magazine and the author of “Two Wheels Good: The History and Mystery of the Bicycle.”

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5 artists on our radar in June 2022 https://photo2000.co.uk/5-artists-on-our-radar-in-june-2022/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 23:01:03 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/5-artists-on-our-radar-in-june-2022/ Art Art Editorial “Artists on Our Radar” is a monthly series produced by the Artsy team. Using our artistic expertise and access to Artsy data, we’re spotlighting five artists who are catching our attention. To make our selections, we determined which artists made an impact in the past month through new gallery showings, exhibitions, auctions, […]]]>

Art

Art Editorial

“Artists on Our Radar” is a monthly series produced by the Artsy team. Using our artistic expertise and access to Artsy data, we’re spotlighting five artists who are catching our attention. To make our selections, we determined which artists made an impact in the past month through new gallery showings, exhibitions, auctions, art fairs or new work on Artsy.

Born in 1991, Taipei. Lives and works in New York.

With a background in fashion and visual arts, Taiwanese artist John Yuyi started making and selling temporary tattoos to fund his visa after interning with Jason Wu in New York. Impactful tattoos have become an integral part of Yuyi’s photographic practice. Her models, sometimes models, sometimes herself, are covered in it to comment on consumer culture and the effects of social media.

In Wear NIKE 7 (2018), featured in Yuyi’s eponymous solo exhibition opening June 10 at Galerie Christophe Guye in Zurich, a figure bears the iconic slogan “Just Do It” inscribed across her bare chest. The Nike logo also appears on his face and neck alongside computer icons and pop-up browsers from the 2000s, illustrating how we construct our identities in the post-internet era through brand affinity.

During this time at Tinder match 2 (2016), a young woman with “It’s a match!” printed on her cheek and “NOPE” on her forehead poses for the camera. The work demonstrates how social media validation has become a potential source of identity construction and self-esteem measurement.

Yuyi’s photographs both engage with and critique how internet culture has shaped our perception of ourselves and others. She has exhibited in group exhibitions in New York, Paris, Taipei and elsewhere, and is Artist-in-Residence 2021-2022 at the Silver Art Project in New York.

—Isabelle Sakelaris

Born in 1936, Shigaraki, Japan. Lives and works in Shigaraki, Japan.

The work of ceramic artist Yasuhisa Kohyama is deeply rooted in the history of craftsmanship and her heritage in her native Japan. His sometimes organic, sometimes geometric forms were the subject of a solo exhibition at Officine Saffi in Milan earlier this year, and are currently on display in a group exhibition at browngrotta arts in Wilton, Connecticut.

Focused on ancient hand-building and wood-firing practices and deeply influenced by Jomon, Shigaraki and Yayoi pottery, Kohyama keeps the past alive by creating stoneware pieces that are both raw and elegant, unmistakably earthly yet almost extraterrestrial. Although he never uses glazes in his work, his vessels take on a variety of hues when fired in the anagamakiln he built, the first of its kind built in the region since the Middle Ages.

Kohyama studied as an apprentice with ceramic designer Sakuzo Hineno and taught at the Cleveland Institute of Art; School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts; and Office for the Arts at Harvard; among other schools. His work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, and many other institutions.

—Brian P. Kelly

B. 1988, McAllen, TX. Lives and works in Los Angeles.

Carlos Jaramillo’s photographs document the daily physical labor involved in Latin American culture and life. In his 2018 solo exhibition “Beyond Bars” at the Gallery at W83 in New York, Jaramillo flipped the script on common tourist images of Peru to tenderly chronicle, via portraits, life within and just beyond. of Lurigancho, a prison in Lima.

For his current solo show “Tierra del Sol,” or Land of the Sun, Jaramillo has turned New York’s Selenas Mountain into a rodeo. On the gallery walls are Jaramillo’s images of the annual “El Clásico de las Américas” charrería in Pico Rivera, California. A charrería is a Mexican rodeo tradition that features the horsemanship, performance, costume, and athleticism of early cattle herding activities in the haciendas of Old Mexico. In these photographs, Jaramillo humanizes often overlooked work for the spectacle of sport through intense, fragmented close-ups of performers’ bodies.

Jaramillo received a BFA from the School of Visual Arts and his photographs have been featured widely in popular magazines and publications including The New York Times, the new yorker, Los Angeles Timeand Museum Magazine. He was the 2022 recipient of the Forest Lawn Museum Arts Fellowship.

—Ayanna Dozier

Born in 1984 in Brovary, Ukraine. Lives and works in Kyiv.

Zhanna Kadyrova has become famous for her practice of transforming familiar building materials, such as industrial tiles, glass and stone, into impressive conceptual sculptures that take aim at the Soviet history of her native Ukraine. In a new work that responds to the invasion of Ukraine by Russian forces on February 24, Kadyrova focuses on the Ukrainian people at this time.

After the invasion, Kadyrova left her home in Kyiv and headed west, settling in a village near the Hungarian border, where she set up a studio and gallery. There, a number of smooth large stones in a river caught Kadyrova’s eye. They resembled the simple round wheat loaves found across Ukraine and sparked the idea for a new body of work – “Palyanitsia”, the Ukrainian word for bread.

Palyanitsia has become a kind of shibboleth. The hard-to-pronounce word is used by Ukrainians to distinguish Russian enemies from Ukrainian comrades. Inspired by the symbolism, Kadyrova gathered the stones and cut them into chunks and slices, while leaving some whole. The resulting sculptures are on display in Venice until June 30 in a special exhibition sharing the name of the series, presented by the Galleria Continua on the occasion of the Biennale; and were previously exhibited in Berlin at the König Galerie. Kadyrova donates 100% of proceeds to voluntary organizations and her peers who remained in Kyiv to join the defensive forces. So simple, yet so effective, the works are stark reminders of the devastating loss of life, displacement and destruction.

A graduate of the Taras Shevchenko art school in Kyiv, Kadyrova has received numerous international accolades for her work, including the main PinchukArtCentre prize in 2013. She has been presented at the 55th, 56th and 58th editions of the Venice Biennale, including the 2019 international exhibition “May You Live in Interesting Times”. Her work has been exhibited in major institutions and galleries, including the Galleria Continua, the Baró Galeria, the Shanghai International Sculpture Project JISP, the Palais de Tokyo, the Center Pompidou and the Pinchuk Art Centre, where, before the current conflict, she was to stage his first career retrospective in 2023.

—Casey Lesser

Born in 1981, Brooklyn. Lives and works in Nashville.

Emily Weiner’s paintings, often housed in custom-made frames, are rich in symbolism and historical allusions. As Weiner described in his artist statement, “my works configure material icons, geometries, and patterns that have been revived, reshaped, and recoded over time.” Reusing the past while creating a contemporary lexicon of her own, Weiner eagerly explores a wide range of aesthetic avenues.

In Cassandra (2022), a terracotta frame borders a painting of an ancient Greek red-figure krater, while in Mundus Inversus (2022), a maple frame draws a shimmering moon peeking through a pair of blood-red curtains. These works evoke artists from all over the history of art – from Euphronios to Georgia O’Keefe to Jonas Wood – while refusing to be pinpointed by any particular era.

Weiner earned a BA from Barnard College and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts. She has been exhibited at Columbia University’s LeRoy Neiman Gallery, CULT | Aimee Friberg and Grizzly Grizzly exhibits. His work has recently been included in group exhibitions at the Red Arrow Gallery, including “SHOW UP!” and “Mundus Inversus”.

—Brian P. Kelly

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Cassandra Ellis sets the tone https://photo2000.co.uk/cassandra-ellis-sets-the-tone/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 03:55:36 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/cassandra-ellis-sets-the-tone/ There is a special harmony in the house of Cassandra Ellis. Inside, the atmosphere is supernaturally calm. For anyone familiar with Atelier Ellis, the independent paint business (originally called Ellis Paints) set up by the New Zealand-born designer in 2018, this comes as no surprise. Recognized for her sensitivity to color, Ellis approaches the world […]]]>

There is a special harmony in the house of Cassandra Ellis. Inside, the atmosphere is supernaturally calm. For anyone familiar with Atelier Ellis, the independent paint business (originally called Ellis Paints) set up by the New Zealand-born designer in 2018, this comes as no surprise. Recognized for her sensitivity to color, Ellis approaches the world of painting with an artist’s eye. In a crowded and often statement-oriented market, her aesthetic, embodied in the annual color collections she conjures up and produces by hand in her studio in a former Victorian laundry room in Battersea, is quietly beautiful.

This aesthetic permeates every aspect of Ellis’ life. Notably, the penthouse apartment she shares with her husband Ed Prichard, her daughter Frankie and their dogs Mr Darcy, a chocolate Labrador and the Australian terrier Otis. It’s a place with a visual stillness that reflects their thoughtful yet welcoming way of life. Located inside what was once Lavender Hill School, a coeducational primary built in 1891 by TJ Bailey, the plush 2,000 square foot South London interior is an ode to lateral living. The handsome red-brick site, known as The Village, has been called out by everyone from David Linley to Kelly Hoppen since it was converted into studios and apartments in the late 1990s. Ellis’ Own Corner is accessed via the Old Boys Entrance and sits across from what was once the photo studio of provocative image maker Bob Carlos Clarke.

Cassandra Ellis’ Labrador, Mr Darcy, sleeps in the kitchen of his Battersea home. The corridor is painted in Tirzah © Martin Morrell

The south-facing kitchen, painted in Khadi
The south-facing kitchen, painted in Khadi © Martin Morrell

When Ellis first saw the duplex in 2015, it had been languishing on the market for more than two years. The interior, she said, was a nightmare of floral wallpaper and faux pine paneling with an overbearing kitchen island. Apart from a fine Victorian skylight in the hall, all original features and fireplaces had been removed. “It felt like I was in a really bad, very expensive Dorset cottage,” she says. Beyond the flashy, old-fashioned surface, Ellis saw promise in the direction of light in space. Rather than hiring an architect, she worked with a draftsman to take the interior apart and start over. “There was nothing that could be saved,” she said. “We had to fill 12 dumpsters.”

As the extension was not an option, Ellis completely redesigned the space over a period of nine months, cutting and sculpting it to suit the couple’s needs. “It’s now such a nice, simple, easy-going place to live,” says Ellis, who moved from a classic terraced house in Peckham, which she’s since equated with cramped hallways and superfluous bedrooms. Therefore, she saw the move as a chance to rebalance and simplify, designing a home without wasted space. The resulting interior has a flowing European style, in a row, with generously proportioned rooms branching off either side of the central hallway. Light streams in from the living room to the north, which is connected by a long and extensive library of art, design and cooking books, and from the kitchen and dining room to the south.

The living room, painted in Cass, with shelves for music and books, a Victorian fireplace by Chesneys and dining chairs by Børge Mogensen

The living room, painted in Cass, with shelves for music and books, a Victorian fireplace by Chesneys and dining chairs by Børge Mogensen © Martin Morrell

One of the bathrooms:

One of the bathrooms: “I wanted it to be relaxed and calm” © Martin Morrell

Convenient for 21-year-old Frankie, who retreats here whenever she feels like it, there’s a separate stairwell that leads to her self-contained ‘mini-apartment’ with its own bedroom and bathroom. The other goes up to the master bedroom and bathroom, the mezzanine of which overlooks London through the epic window that begins in the sunken living room. “There’s something exciting about living high up in the city,” says Ellis. On a clear day, the view stretches from Chelsea Harbor to the city.

The interior was imagined with the same intuition that Ellis applies when designing his paintings, and there is a narrative behind the design. “I imagined a story describing how the place should be,” she says, pointing to the emphasis on cooking and reading, and the rooms configured for both contemplation and community. This is a method that has proven to be extraordinarily effective. Whether on their own or hosting a crowd of 30 for a celebratory lunch, as Ellis and Prichard did when they married last September, it’s a lovely spot.

The master bedroom, with a bespoke painting and a painting by Dick Frizzell
The master bedroom, with bespoke painting and painting by Dick Frizzell © Martin Morrell
The living room, with a sofa designed by Ellis

The living room, with a sofa designed by Ellis © Martin Morrell

Drawing on a trio of materials – English oak for the floors, pippy oak for the bespoke benches and shelving, and silver emperador marble for the surfaces throughout – Ellis has created an elegant yet understated sanctuary. “Houses are often very plain or overly decorated,” she says. “But it’s a very tactile apartment. I wanted it to be relaxed and quiet, but lots to browse and look at. There’s an eclectic mix of art and design that ranges from Isamu Noguchi lights that are scattered everywhere to Howard Hodgkin canvases to eBay finds and beach combing. There are plenty of personal touches: A bright self-portrait of Prichard’s mother hangs in the stairwell, while in the bedroom, an alcove of custom shelving serves as a shrine to loved ones filled with drawings and paintings. precious ephemera, family photos and keepsakes.


Materiality is key to Ellis’ approach. She used brass objects here and there to accentuate the newly refreshed palette – from a boxed ivy specimen by artist Sophie Coryndon to a leaf-shaped wall lamp by Italian designer Tommaso Barbi. In the bedroom, an embroidered 1920s room divider featuring George and the Dragon sits next to a wonky but wondrous Georgian table by Jolly Folke that has been burnt black using ancient Japanese techniques of shou sugi ban. Downstairs in the long library is a bench from the Viennese Secession movement, built in the 1890s by Austrian furniture makers Jacob & Josef Kohn. “Sitting here with a book is such a joyful thing for me,” Ellis says. With its elaborate relief design, the seat, which oscillates between art nouveau and modernism, is framed by a wall tapestry collected long ago in New Zealand. Often called barkcloth, this Pacific Island cloth is made from the inner bark, usually of a wild fig or mulberry tree, which is decorated with paint or vegetable dye.

The entrance hall, painted in Tirzah, with a sofa designed by Ellis and a coffee table by Osvaldo Borsani

The entrance hall, painted in Tirzah, with a sofa designed by Ellis and a coffee table by Osvaldo Borsani © Martin Morrell

The kitchen, with cupboards designed by Ellis and a pippy oak worktop
The kitchen, with cupboards designed by Ellis and a pippy oak worktop © Martin Morrell

It’s a throwback to one of Ellis’ previous callings – and a lifelong passion for textiles. From the 1990s, she worked in set design and events for television and magazines between London and Auckland before settling permanently in the capital in 2008, where she wrote books on quilting and textiles. antiques and sold custom creations. Daughter of an accomplished seamstress, she says: “I have always known how to sew, dye and weave. The sound of a sewing machine still puts me to sleep. Take a look around his apartment and you’ll be tricked into finding a new piece of fabric. Beds, sofas and armchairs are dotted with her indigo-dyed patchwork covers and each cushion is upholstered in faded linen or hemp, some embellished with sumptuous scraps of fabric that she accumulates. She spends free time putting them together to make gifts for friends.

Ellis in the living room;  the walls are painted in Cass, with windows in Aged Black

Ellis in the living room; the walls are painted in Cass, with windows in Aged Black

There is a very clear line to be drawn between the faded patina of these time-worn textiles and the nuanced, earthy paints of Atelier Ellis. “I always wanted to create the colors that I saw in my mind when I was working with these old fabrics,” she says. Ellis believes that creating colors with a more grounded base, which contain a multitude of pigments that react to changes in light, makes rooms and dwellers happier. Instead of bright whites, Khadi’s soft, deep, warm tones bring warmth to the kitchen, or brilliantly bold distressed black in Frankie’s bedroom. “I’ve always equated color with place and feeling,” says Ellis, who started mixing paints as a child, decorating and redecorating the playhouse her grandfather created in the garden of his home in Papakura. , a southern suburb of Auckland, with its own house. color mixtures.

Frankie's bedroom, painted in Aged Black, with a painting by Howard Hodgkin and a bedspread made from antique, indigo-dyed textiles

Frankie’s bedroom, painted in Aged Black, with a painting by Howard Hodgkin and an antique, indigo-dyed textile bedspread © Martin Morrell

Mr Darcy sleeps in the hallway, painted in Cass

Mr Darcy sleeps in the hallway, painted in Cass © Martin Morrell

Each of the couple’s homes – they have converted and sold seven properties since meeting in 2007 – have served as canvases for Atelier Ellis. Rather than adhering to the dictates of design, be it Bloomsbury or Brutalism, Ellis believes the power of color lies in guessing what suits the place and the person. She works with architects, designers and creatives including Mayfair emporium The New Craftsmen and furniture designer Fred Rigby, often creating bespoke palettes for entire projects that can start with a single brief – one architect asked an entire house in Turneresque watercolors.

Ellis is finishing up her latest collection, released in September, which is a celebration of eclecticism and human idiosyncrasy in interiors, borrowing from the works of everyone from Rita Angus to Amrita Sher-Gil. In an age of visual bombardment, Ellis says, people can get stuck when it comes to painting their homes. There is a danger in following trends without thinking. Ellis encourages clients to think about what they really like and need. “We all have personal associations with color. It’s about giving you permission to choose,” she says. While tones can tell stories, the key to finding yours isn’t on Instagram, but within.

atelierellis.fr

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White Key Marketing, Platinum Media & Communications, The Photo Studio, King Kong, Dinosaur Designs & Integral Ad Science https://photo2000.co.uk/white-key-marketing-platinum-media-communications-the-photo-studio-king-kong-dinosaur-designs-integral-ad-science/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 11:28:59 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/white-key-marketing-platinum-media-communications-the-photo-studio-king-kong-dinosaur-designs-integral-ad-science/ white key marketing is young and dynamic sydney digital marketing agency specializing in creating engaging content, strategic social media campaigns, branding projects and other digital marketing services such as websites and paid advertisements. With a reputable portfolio of large and small clients, they stand out in the industry thanks to their professional, passionate and dynamic […]]]>

white key marketing is young and dynamic sydney digital marketing agency specializing in creating engaging content, strategic social media campaigns, branding projects and other digital marketing services such as websites and paid advertisements. With a reputable portfolio of large and small clients, they stand out in the industry thanks to their professional, passionate and dynamic team. They are looking for a motivated and enthusiastic person Social Media Coordinator to join their growing team. You will be responsible for planning and executing a results-driven social media strategy. You will also develop and implement targeted communications for digital marketing solutions, develop, maintain and manage day-to-day client relationships and facilitate regular strategy meetings. To be successful in this role, you will have a passion for digital marketing and proficiency with major social media platforms and social media management tools. You will have a proven ability to manage client relationships and the ability to understand historical, current and future trends in digital content and social media. If you are up for this great opportunity Apply now!

Platinum Media & Communications, situated at sydneylooking for someone with experience Digital Marketing and Social Media Manager who can create, manage and optimize both social media and digital marketing activities for a range of clients in a variety of categories including the beauty, health and medical, fashion and of lifestyle. This role will require you to implement the social and digital marketing strategy and be responsible for the consistency of the brand message and image across all communication platforms in line with the overall brand strategy. Reporting directly to the agency owner, you will join a small but strategic team with a real focus on on-the-job training and development as well as internal agency information and communication skills. If you are looking to further develop your social media and digital marketing skills and progress within a long-term, full-service marketing agency, this role could be for you! Apply now!

The photography studio is an industry leader in fashion portraits and innovative magazine-style model portfolios, with over 50 staff in its already established warehouse studios in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne. It’s a dynamic studio, energetic and passionate about what it does. The photo studio is looking for a Internal Photographer assistants be part of their team. This will be a great position for anyone who is passionate about fashion/portrait photography and wants to gain hands-on studio experience in a dynamic and fun environment. In this role you will learn from industry leaders with years of experience, attend workshops in: basic lighting, creative lighting, posing + direction and use the studio towards the end of your internship, to build and work on your own wallet. . If you are excited about this opportunity Apply now!

King Kong is a melbourne full-service digital marketing agency growing FAST! For the past three years, they have been ranked as the fastest growing digital agency and the 17th fastest growing company in the country by The Australian Financial Review. It’s a world-class herd of digital strategists, direct-response marketers, designers, growth hackers, and developers, who have come together to help their clients achieve their growth goals. Due to this incredible growth there is an opportunity for a full time position Digital Marketing Strategist. You will work directly with a portfolio of clients managing communication and identifying improvements to their SEO and pay-per-click campaigns (Google AdWords, Facebook Ads & YouTube Ads). Their team of specialists will create and manage client campaigns, allowing you to focus on digging deeper into each account to build a strategy for King Kong to achieve even greater ROI for the client. With their team of specialists at your disposal, they are looking for an analytical mind that is results-oriented and dedicated to seeing their clients dominate their market. To be successful in this role, you will have 1-2 years of agency experience in a similar role – this is not essential, but you will need to have in-depth knowledge and a passion for digital marketing including SEO, PPC ( Google AdWords, Facebook), Conversion Rate Optimization and Growth Hacking. A thirst to learn and improve your existing skills is also essential. Does that sound great to you? Apply now!

Featured Jobs: White Key Marketing, Platinum Media & Communications, The Photo Studio, King Kong, Dinosaur Designs & Integral Ad ScienceDinosaur Drawings is one of Australia’s leading design and manufacturing brands and they are looking for a Production supervisor manage and manufacture their assembled jewelry in the sydney studio. Working alongside the Production Manager and other production supervisors, the ideal candidate is someone who is ready to take on more responsibility in terms of developing their teams and maintaining high production output. The Finishing Supervisor will have a 2IC as a direct report, to assist them with day-to-day tasks, troubleshoot issues that arise, and work together cohesively to create an efficient, clean, organized shop and smooth product flow through the shop. inside and outside of it. Production work for this role will consist of assembling resin and metal necklaces, pendants, key chains, earrings, and salt/pepper mills. Experience in jewelry making is essential. Managing and repairing repairs from their stores will also be part of this role. If you have experience in jewelry assembly/making and are up for the challenge of being responsible for an entire department including personnel, product and machinery, then this role is for you. you ! Apply now!

Integral advertising science (IAS) is a global leader in digital media quality. IAS makes every impression count, by ensuring ads are viewable by real people, in safe and responsive environments, by enabling contextual targeting and optimizing the supply path. IAS are looking for an experienced and highly motivated individual Customer Success Manager to join their team sydney. The Customer Success Manager will partner with Sales and Technical Account Management to achieve high level onboarding, retention, growth and engagement with priority customer accounts. The primary focus of this role is to shorten the time to value realization, cement strong relationships with key upper-level stakeholders, and ultimately secure renewals for their most valuable accounts. The Customer Success Manager will develop in-depth knowledge of the verification and analysis space within the advertising industry and use this knowledge to support and advise clients’ digital media strategies. This role will suit an experienced Customer Success Manager who is passionate about impact, generating ROI for their clients, and building strong, high-level relationships with agencies and marketers directly. look like you, Apply now!

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