Photography studio – Photo 2000 http://photo2000.co.uk/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 07:41:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://photo2000.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Photography studio – Photo 2000 http://photo2000.co.uk/ 32 32 Greenwood District Studio needs community help to stay open https://photo2000.co.uk/greenwood-district-studio-needs-community-help-to-stay-open/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 00:44:00 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/greenwood-district-studio-needs-community-help-to-stay-open/ GRAND LEDGE, Michigan – The Greenwood District Studios opened last year in hopes of making the community laugh, but as they explained in a recent viral Tik Tok, it’s been a struggle. In March, when the owner, who goes by Amaru, got the keys to an abandoned theater next to the Lansing Mall, he had […]]]>

GRAND LEDGE, Michigan – The Greenwood District Studios opened last year in hopes of making the community laugh, but as they explained in a recent viral Tik Tok, it’s been a struggle.

In March, when the owner, who goes by Amaru, got the keys to an abandoned theater next to the Lansing Mall, he had a vision to bring it back to life.

“Greenwood District Studios is our tribute to what happened in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1921. Black Wall Street had a neighborhood called Greenwood, which was burnt down, was a bustling community of black businesses,” Amaru said.

But this vision proved difficult. Greenwood posted on Tik Tok that they were going through tough times. The video attracted over 13,000 likes and over 500 comments.

“The plan was to open a drive-in during the summer. And we got approved by the Planning Commission and then the [Delta Township] the board denied it. So it really hurt us in terms of revenue, ”explained Amaru.

He said that between COVID and the denial of the drive-in plan, they had caught up.

They had to find other sources of income, like creating rental spaces for photographers and filmmakers, starting a acting class, and continuing to run their Funny Is Funny Comedy Club.

Kathy Wolfe volunteers at the theater and says it hurts to see him wrestle.

“I think the main reason people don’t support him is that they don’t know it. Amaru started this on a shoestring budget and doesn’t have the funds to do the publicity that needs to be done for him. they’re making themselves known, ”Wolfe said. noted.

If you’d like to support the business, spread the word, catch a show, or donate to their GoFundMe.

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Hidden composition revealed under Botticelli’s painting “Man of Pain” https://photo2000.co.uk/hidden-composition-revealed-under-botticellis-painting-man-of-pain/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 04:24:10 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/hidden-composition-revealed-under-botticellis-painting-man-of-pain/ This article was originally published by The Art Newspaper, an editorial partner of CNN Style. Sandro Botticelli’s rediscovered and arrested man of pain, set to be auctioned off at Sotheby’s on January 27 – with a $ 40 million guarantee – has yet to be fully investigated as he is in the hands of private […]]]>
This article was originally published by The Art Newspaper, an editorial partner of CNN Style.

Sandro Botticelli’s rediscovered and arrested man of pain, set to be auctioned off at Sotheby’s on January 27 – with a $ 40 million guarantee – has yet to be fully investigated as he is in the hands of private since the 19th century.

But the technical analysis undertaken by the auction house in preparation for the sale has already revealed an unexpected discovery: an intriguing image of a Madonna and Child, buried under layers of paint.

Chris Apostle, the senior vice president and director of Old Master paintings at Sotheby’s in New York, who has had the opportunity to ponder the image in depth, believes it is an abandoned composition by a “Madonna of Tenderness” (a type derived from Greek icons), in which the Virgin cradles the head of the infant Christ intimately against hers, cheek to cheek. The facial features, in particular the nose, eyes and laughing mouth, which he identifies as belonging to the Baby Jesus, are very visible in the infrared image, if turned upside down.

An infrared image of “Man of Sorrows” reveals the faint outline of a Madonna and Child below. Credit: courtesy of Sotheby’s

This head occupies a space under the Man of Sorrows chest, while what appears to be an eye and eyebrow, belonging to a female head, protrude from the area near Christ’s right hand, according to Sotheby’s. There are also traces of a white undercoat, possibly cadmium, in the lower part of the figure. Other visible parts of the abandoned composition include what resemble folds of a coat, with decorative bands around the shoulder and part of a sleeve, and the child’s chubby arm is also discernible.

Some lines in this lower drawing are thicker than others, suggesting that they may have been drawn from a standard cartoon and then run in liquid pigment. But the head of the infant Jesus, suggested the Apostle, is a “unique”: there is no replica in any Botticelli autograph or studio work for what we see here.

The red outline on an upside down image of the painting shows the Madonna and Child below.

The red outline on an upside down image of the painting shows the Madonna and Child below. Credit: courtesy of Sotheby’s

So, is it unusual to find such a sub-drawing? The apostle says he has encountered this sort of thing before. “The sign was a precious commodity in the Renaissance,” he explained. one wouldn’t want to throw it away. “And so, it seems, Botticelli took the panel, turned it the other way around and decided to use it for an extraordinary composition, which reflected religious angst. half a millennium of Italy at that time.The new work is tentatively dated to around 1500, when the predictions of the apocalypse and the hopes for personal salvation had reached a particular level of intensity.

The poplar panel used by Botticelli was the standard painting medium in Renaissance Florence. Sotheby’s technical analysis reveals a crack in the middle and an old knot in the wood and shows the panel was “reconfigured at some point in the 20th century,” according to Apostle. It is sandwiched on a modern board, with the original back and front on either side (“a type of masking,” the apostle explained). The paint layers are in “fairly good condition,” he continued although a bit chewed up around the edges, and there are additions at the top and bottom of the image.

The face of the Baby Jesus (turned vertically for clarity) is visible in the infrared image.

The face of the Baby Jesus (turned vertically for clarity) is visible in the infrared image. Credit: courtesy of Sotheby’s

The infrared images also show that Botticelli made certain adjustments to the composition, according to Sotheby’s analysis. For example, the tip of a finger that probed the gaping wound on Christ’s side is now covered by his robe, and there is a change in the position of the wound and the profile of the thumb, with the effect that the wound is “minimized” a bit, as the Apostle said. There is also evidence that Botticelli altered the length of Christ’s hair, his chin, and the placement of some of the crown thorns as well as his eyebrows.

Regarding Botticelli’s typical pictorial technique, the apostle said that “he changed it” here, by mixing tempera and oil. “It is very difficult without making samples to say what the binding medium is,” he said. “But the technique seems pretty consistent with what I would expect to see. We have the XRF technology so we can look at, for example, the element cadmium, and we have a lead map, which shows where the fillings are. and losses. Pigments include chromium, titanium and so on – all the pigments you would expect to see. “

As with Botticelli’s “Portrait of a Young Man Holding a Cockade”, sold last year by Sotheby’s in New York for $ 92 million, lead paint is used extensively throughout the composition, with some mixed with preparatory soil for gesso.
"Man of sorrows" will be auctioned on January 27 at Sotheby's New York.

“Man of Sorrows” will be auctioned on January 27 at Sotheby’s New York. Credit: courtesy of Sotheby’s

The small cross at the top of the composition was rendered by marking lines in the surface of the painting, and then moved (such incisions are also visible in “Portrait of a Young Man Holding a Cockade”). “It would have been far too right,” said the apostle, although the cross and Christ were still positioned asymmetrically. This asymmetry contrasts with a comparative contemporary image, Leonardo da Vinci’s “Salvator Mundi” (another anomalous old master image, which sold for $ 450 million at Christie’s New York in 2017), where Christ is presented from rigid way, as in the famous “Veil of Veronica” relic of Christ.

“For me, what I find touching is that Christ is a little off-center,” said the apostle. “Botticelli nodded slightly, which is more human.”

At 55 or older when painting the work, Botticelli would have been in the last decade of his life, the apostle pointed out. “I feel there is something about this image that Botticelli is projecting, an understanding that we are all going to die – it has a deep emotional charge,” he said. “If he had represented Christ full and rigid, it would look more like an icon, a little more impenetrable.”

Read more stories from The arts journal here.
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The week in Pune: catch a murderer, work with stage lights or get lost in pandemic portraits https://photo2000.co.uk/the-week-in-pune-catch-a-murderer-work-with-stage-lights-or-get-lost-in-pandemic-portraits/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 08:15:56 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/the-week-in-pune-catch-a-murderer-work-with-stage-lights-or-get-lost-in-pandemic-portraits/ Pradeep Vaidya, who won the META Theater Award for Best Lighting Design in 2007, 2011 and 2016, among other accolades, will host a workshop on theater lighting. It includes primary video sessions which can be viewed online from January 15th. The videos were made for an InFocus online workshop, hosted by Delhi-based Studio Safdar last […]]]>

Pradeep Vaidya, who won the META Theater Award for Best Lighting Design in 2007, 2011 and 2016, among other accolades, will host a workshop on theater lighting. It includes primary video sessions which can be viewed online from January 15th. The videos were made for an InFocus online workshop, hosted by Delhi-based Studio Safdar last year. This workshop will consist of three modules – while the first (January 15-31) will be online, the second and third will be physical sessions held at The Box on the first two weekends of February. Registrations will be open from January 10 to 13. Contact: 98220 59429

Meera Majumdar is watching a play with an old flame. Meanwhile, her husband, Niranjan, hatches a plan to assassinate her. It is infallible, the alibis are ingenious and the date is fixed. So, one rainy night, Meera sleeps alone in her house. At the time indicated, the telephone rings. As Meera gets up to answer them, she has no idea of ​​the dark shadow behind her curtains. What happens next is the subject of the play, A Perfect Murder, directed by Vijay Kenkre. It will be presented at the Tilak Smarak Mandir on January 15 at 5 p.m. Entrance: Rs 300 and more.

In Raah: a literacy and culture center, an aspiring actor can participate in a “character building workshop” by Suyog Deshpande. It will include an introduction to various forms of theater, understanding the basic skills and tools needed to perform, exercises to unleash your imagination and emotions, make powerful choices and use technique to create complex and enlightening performances, a scene study, scenario analysis and a character. development and practical application of the concept at work. January 15 and 16 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Donation Pass: Rs 500. Age criteria: 15 years and over. Contact: 99 705 54075

“Between One Shore and Many Others” is a solo exhibition by Vivek Vilasini, a multimedia artist from Kerala. This series presents his latest photographic prints that capture movement and captivity during the pandemic, giving an aesthetic dimension to the situation. At the VHC gallery in Koregaon Park until February.

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Dance floors forever: a special photography https://photo2000.co.uk/dance-floors-forever-a-special-photography/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 05:00:36 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/dance-floors-forever-a-special-photography/ Photographers who work at night know better than anyone how well the human eye adapts to the absence of light. The rest of us tend to take night vision for granted or realize that we have it, in the middle of the night or stepping out of a dark theater, almost by accident. Not to […]]]>

Photographers who work at night know better than anyone how well the human eye adapts to the absence of light. The rest of us tend to take night vision for granted or realize that we have it, in the middle of the night or stepping out of a dark theater, almost by accident.

Not to the photographer, however. For them, the eye is another instrument, another set of lenses capable of the myriads of infinitesimal adjustments necessary to capture the evanescence of light and its opposite.

Most of the images in this special issue were taken at night. But the amount of light or darkness inside isn’t just a technical matter. This is, in essence, the subject. Dancing, partying, expressing yourself, getting away from it all – all of these activities are basically reactions to the amount of light or darkness one feels in his life, day or moment.

It’s no accident, I think, that the best dance floors – whether in the common room of a retirement home or in an underground queer club of a homophobic dictatorship – alternate between light states.

You may well ask yourself, as we have done, why dwell on pictures of rejoicing in a time of grief and isolation? Because the heart, like the eyes, has a way of adapting to darkness. And looking at these photos, it becomes evident that this is a two way process.

Matt Vella, Editor-in-Chief, FT Weekend Magazine


Tod Papageorge

All images Untitled, from the Studio 54 series, New York, 1978-1980 © Tod Papageorge. Courtesy of Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne

I took these photographs between 1978 and 1980 at Studio 54, the New York nightclub that, during those years, was the place to be and be seen – like the celebrities, party people, and dance freaks who lapped it up. were filling up every night were happy to prove it. .

Given its reputation (which has exploded in the club’s 33 months of existence), it was difficult to enter: unperturbed doormen distributing access as if controlling passage to a fabulous realm.

Only famous or socially connected people could assume that they would find themselves guided around the herd of hopeful celebrants who were dying on the street side of the Velvet Rope and being led through the gate. If not, the thing most likely to help was to be beautiful.

Once inside, everyone seemed delighted to be there no matter how they handled it – an excitement fueled by the pulsating disco beat and brilliantly designed interiors that, on a party night, could. suggest anything from Caliban’s cave to a harem.

I hoped to capture in these photographs something of the topicality of flesh, sweat and desire that filled Studio 54 like a physical atmosphere, using a medium format camera and the richly toned negatives it produced. to help me do it. After which, traced with all this calm energy, they waited until 2014 to be published and exhibited for the first time.

Tod Papageorge is a photographer based in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. “War & Peace in New York” is at Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne, Germany until February 19, 2022


Sacha Mademuaselle

Photographs taken in Moscow nightclubs, 2019- 2020 © Sasha Mademuaselle

I took these photographs in 2019 and 2020 at nightclubs in Moscow, including queer spaces Horovod and Popoff Kitchen, which is why they feature a lot of almost naked people.

In November 2020 in the Russian capital, we had a curfew at 11 p.m., so the nightlife started earlier, at 6 p.m. It was fun.

Here people love to dance and party because when you do, you feel free – and we don’t have enough freedom in terms of law and government. That’s why we like to feel free in our own way. Partying is how people who are constrained in their daily life push boundaries.

Sasha Mademuaselle is a photographer based in Moscow, Russia


Dhruv Malhotra

Untitled photographs from the After Party series, 2009-2013 © Dhruv Malhotra

Night has always had a powerful attraction for me – silence, a keen sense of the passing of time and the absence of disturbance. I love the fact that the longer you look the more noticeable as the eye adjusts, and that echoes in my photographs where I expose long enough to reveal what is usually left in the dark. .

My nocturnal wanderings led me to many sites that would transform to temporarily host events, then rearrange themselves to accommodate other things. Such transformations usually happen for an occasion – a wedding, banquet, prayer meeting, conference, or public performance – and are put together and taken apart in a day or two.

I have photographed many of these chameleon spaces all over India, looking at them and recording them before they are gone. It is in this recording that we can achieve something, before it blinks and disappears.

Dhruv Malhotra is a photographer based in Jaipur, India


Sasha Phyars-Burgess

© Sasha Phyars-Burgess / Capricieuse

This body of work engages with the idea of ​​liberation through celebration and dance. Although fleeting and ephemeral in nature, the spaces and places created for dancing and partying among people of color, especially blacks, serve as defined and undefined areas of transient freedom.

These photographs were taken during a series of parties, balls and dances in Ithaca, New York, Brooklyn, New York and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They remind me of the words of Frantz Fanon, the postcolonial philosopher, who wrote in his 1961 book The damned of the earth: “At certain times on certain days, men and women meet in a given place, and there, under the solemn eye of the tribe, throw themselves into an apparently disorderly pantomime, which is in reality extremely systematic, in which by various means – shaking the head, bending the spine, throwing the whole body back – can be read as in an open book the immense effort of a community to exorcise itself, to free itself, to explain itself. There are no limits – inside the circle.

Sasha Phyars-Burgess is a photographer based in Chicago, USA. ‘Untitled’ is published by becapricious.com


Elaine constantine

Photographs taken in 2000 in various ballrooms in the Greater Manchester area © Elaine Constantine / Industry Art

The photographs for “Tea Dance” were the result of a conversation I had with one of my former students, Yuen Fong Ling, in 2000. I had worked at Salford Technical College in the 1980s, where I was there. managed the darkroom and the studio. Yuen had just been hired as a curator at the recently reopened Castlefield Gallery in Manchester and for his inaugural exhibition he wanted something that felt rooted in the local culture.

The 90s had been very youth-oriented, as had my work until then. The old post-war traditions were drawing to a close, and it was through the young – and their unbridled desire and imaginations – that everyone seemed to seek to shape the world anew.

It would have been very easy to do something around Manchester youth culture, but my parents got along well and it just felt right that I should instead commemorate their passing world. The generation I was a part of had become so used to understanding themselves in opposition to their parents’ culture and values ​​that it was easy to forget the deepest underlying commonalities – our parents had experienced their own scenes. music and dance, after all – and the fact that our expanded choices and freedoms were based on the hard work and sacrifice of our parents’ generation. In the working-class communities at least, this was quite the case.

Elaine Constantine is a photographer and director based in London, UK


Andrew Miksys

DISKO series, Lithuania 1999-2010 © Andrew Miksys

For 10 years in the 2000s, I traveled the back roads of Lithuania, photographing teenagers in village nightclubs for my “DISKO” series. Most of the images here are in houses of culture from the Soviet era where I sometimes found abandoned paintings of Lenin, old movie posters, gas masks, and other relics of the Soviet Union. I became fascinated by the teenagers who reveled among this debris of a dead empire. This series of photographs is about young Lithuanians, a past in ruins and an uncertain future, all gathered in one room.

Andrew Miksys is a photographer based in Vilnius, Lithuania


Mitch epstein

Rosy, Meghraj Cabaret, Bombay, Maharashtra, India 1984
© Mitch Epstein. Courtesy of Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne

In 1984, I was director of photography on India Cabaret, a documentary film by Mira Nair about the lives of six cabaret dancers at the Meghraj Cabaret in the suburbs of Mumbai, India. At the end of the shoot, I put down my camera and picked up my camera. I photographed the dancers and tapped into the trust that had established between us.

Mitch Epstein is a photographer based in New York, United States. ‘In India’ is published by steidl.de


Dana lixenberg

V103 Steppers Ball at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Chicago 2002 © Dana Lixenberg

In the 1990s, I was a regular contributor to Vibe magazine, photographing artists such as Tupac and Biggie. In 2002, along with hip-hop pioneer and visual artist Fab 5 Freddy, I was sent to Chicago to document his famous steppin ‘scene, which began in the city’s black communities in the 1970s. Fab 5 Freddy was writing about it for Vibe.

The direct ancestor of the Chicago steppin ‘is the bop; it is a kind of dance where the fastest movements and the most complex footwork are often reserved for men. We went to the V103 Steppers Ball at the Hyatt Regency, Chicago’s biggest steppin event. There was a huge crowd on the dance floor, so I set up my lights and 5×4 field camera on the side of the grand ballroom and invited some of the couples to show me their moves there. .

The whole scene was thrilling: great music and people dressed to perfection. “Watching the steppers stand up simultaneously, grabbing mates and sailing on the move when the right song is ringing is like seeing people walking on water,” Fab 5 Freddy wrote in his post. “A dreamlike, transcendent and rhythmic elegance prevails, and the cool attitude of the stepper pervades the room like nightfall.”

Dana Lixenberg is a photographer and director based in Amsterdam, the Netherlands


This story is part of the FT magazine package “Tales from the Dance Floor”, featuring Rosa Lyster on the best fictional parties, Caleb Azumah Nelson on the magic of a good DJ – and six FT writers remembering the best party they attended

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New York’s Kapp Kapp gallery moves to Peter Doig’s former studio – ARTnews.com https://photo2000.co.uk/new-yorks-kapp-kapp-gallery-moves-to-peter-doigs-former-studio-artnews-com/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:11:00 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/new-yorks-kapp-kapp-gallery-moves-to-peter-doigs-former-studio-artnews-com/ Next week, after just two and a half years in business, the Kapp Kapp Gallery will open a new space in Tribeca where artist Peter Doig once had his New York studio. The new space, which measures 1,800 square feet, will occupy the fourth floor of 86 Walker Street and will open on January 15 […]]]>

Next week, after just two and a half years in business, the Kapp Kapp Gallery will open a new space in Tribeca where artist Peter Doig once had his New York studio. The new space, which measures 1,800 square feet, will occupy the fourth floor of 86 Walker Street and will open on January 15 with a solo exhibition by photographer Stanley Stellar.

Kapp Kapp founders, twin brothers Sam Kapp and Daniel Kapp, said in an interview that they have been thinking about an expansion for several months. “We’ve been in this exciting time of growth,” Sam said. “We thought it was a good time for us to double down on a bigger space.”

The two found the new space through Jonathan Travis, partner of Redwood Property Group, whom the gallery owners have identified as one of the leading real estate brokers for galleries wishing to move to Tribeca. Their new location will be four times the size of either of the gallery’s previous spaces in Philadelphia and New York. “It’s been exciting for a few years at Tribeca – the power is electric,” Daniel said. In recent years, many galleries have moved to the neighborhood, including James Cohan, PPOW, Canada, and Nicodim Gallery.

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The gallery opened its first space in 2019 in Philadelphia, where the brothers grew up and where their mother’s family has lived for generations. Six months later, in January 2020, they opened a small outpost in the Tribeca Arts Building in Lower Manhattan. “It was a really strange time to open in New York,” Sam said, noting that the gallery was only able to host one exhibition before the lockdown. They continued to put on shows but didn’t see foot traffic start to return until September of the same year.

Kapp Kapp’s initial incarnation in New York was intended as a weekend space. At the time, Daniel was working full time for the Marian Goodman Gallery as part of its communications team, and wanted a nearby space that he could schedule in his spare time. They had been drawn to Tribeca initially because of the lineup at the small but influential Queer Thoughts gallery, which was located across the street.

As part of its expansion to New York, Kapp Kapp will close its Philadelphia space and move towards maintaining an office in the city. Calling the change “bittersweet,” Daniel said, “We both decided that our efforts were best focused right now on sustaining a space in this time of growth. “

Two men kiss in an abandoned building, seen from behind an entrance

Stanley Stellar, September, 1979.
Courtesy of the artist and Kapp Kapp

Stellar, who has lived in a Tribeca loft for decades, was the subject of Kapp Kapp’s first solo show in Philadelphia and the first artist to officially join the gallery’s roster. This month at Kapp Kapp, Stellar will show a series of never-before-seen photographs of queer communities on the piers of Christopher Street on the West Side of Manhattan in the 1970s, before the AIDS epidemic. “When it comes to opening our first show here, just minutes from where the piers once were and the neighborhood Stanley saw change around him, it made sense,” Sam said. “This corpus is incredibly sensitive and special.”

The new location comes at a time when the gallery is also adding to the artists it represents, accepting two new ones in addition to the four already featured: Philadelphia-based painter Gilbert Lewis and Velvet Other World, a duo of artists Joshua . Allen and Katrina Pisetti based in Providence, Rhode Island. Part of the reason the gallery expanded, Daniel said, was to provide more space for these artists.

Sam added, “One of our main goals in this new space is to create a welcoming environment, a place where you can have a conversation and see an amazing spectacle.”

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Drown in family photos? Professional photo managers share tips on sorting large collections https://photo2000.co.uk/drown-in-family-photos-professional-photo-managers-share-tips-on-sorting-large-collections/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/drown-in-family-photos-professional-photo-managers-share-tips-on-sorting-large-collections/ Taking pictures is easy, but organizing the tens of thousands that accumulate over a lifetime is anything but. Professional photo managers know it: they make a living sorting, scanning, renaming, restoring, organizing and turning family photo treasures into tidy collections and albums. As Albertans make lofty New Year’s resolutions to organize their photo collections, Karen […]]]>

Taking pictures is easy, but organizing the tens of thousands that accumulate over a lifetime is anything but.

Professional photo managers know it: they make a living sorting, scanning, renaming, restoring, organizing and turning family photo treasures into tidy collections and albums.

As Albertans make lofty New Year’s resolutions to organize their photo collections, Karen Murdock, a photo manager in St. Albert who manages Treasured Photo Collections, expects January and February to be the slowest months. of his year.

“What happens is they think they can do it on their own and they’ll start trying to organize their photos on their own and work with them and then they’ll call us.” , she said.

“It’s like when you go to an art gallery and look at the paintings and say, ‘Oh, I could do this painting, that looks easy. “It’s not that easy,” said Carmen Carvajal, part-time cinematographer who runs Forever Neat Organizing in Edmonton.

Both photo managers claim that organizing large collections of family photos takes time but is ultimately rewarding whether you do it yourself or hire a professional.

‘I was overwhelmed’

With the help of Karen Murdock, Barbara Galbraith of Edmonton threw away four trash bags full of family photos and created photo books to show the highlights in the lives of those close to her.

“I was overwhelmed and didn’t even know how to start this process,” Galbraith said.

Barbara Galbraith holds a photo book that photography manager Karen Murdock helped her produce. (Scott Neufeld / CBC)

“She makes it fun and we laugh and talk about the good old days, when bottled milk was delivered,” Galbraith said.

Murdock prefers to work alongside clients, which she has been doing for decades. Prior to becoming a Photo Manager, she worked in the funeral industry for over 20 years, helping grieving families organize and present photos for memorial services.

Some clients prefer to give him the reins, leaving jars of disorganized photos in his office.

Middle-aged women and petite seniors make up the majority of customers for Carvajal, who discovered the industry after finding a bag of unlabeled photos of her parents and trying to better organize her own collection.

Carmen Carvajal organizes photo collections at her home in South Edmonton. (Carmen Carvajal)

Carvajal said photo managers have an eye for photography and can assess the aesthetic merits of photos without getting bogged down in the memories they conjure up.

“There are some things that we see that the client might not see and we are able to advise which is the best photo to keep,” she said.

Mysteries and discoveries

One of the favorite parts of Murdock’s job is identifying unfamiliar people and places.

She can date photos based on hairstyles and once identified three unknown boys by researching the photography studio where a photo was taken and cross-checking it with a family’s family tree.

Amid hundreds of dog portraits, dull sunsets and duplicates, photo managers sometimes stumble upon surprises, like photos of historical figures or images that are not intended for their eyes.

“A photo was in an envelope and I didn’t know why, and I opened the envelope, took a look at the photo, closed it and returned it to them discreetly so as not to embarrass my customer, ”Murdock said. .

Murdock and Carvajal both belong to an international industry association that shares a set of best practices and a code of ethics.

Organize 101

Having professionally curated photos isn’t cheap or fast – Murdock charges anywhere from $ 52 to $ 72 an hour and some of his projects can take up to a year.

Both photo managers have tips on how to organize a large collection on your own.

Carvajal recommends backing up digital photos, sorting recent photos first, and setting a goal for a project, such as a family member’s birthday.

Photo manager Carmen Carvajal sorts the photos from a trip to Turkey. (Carmen Carvajal)

Photo managers use a letter system for sorting: A for album-worthy photos, B for the best, C for the trash, and S for photos that tell a story.

Murdock suggests breaking up large projects into manageable chunks, having a designated workstation, and using archival safe writing instruments.

She plans to host a free three-hour workshop with a local nonprofit on preserving photo collections on January 17.

“Because everyone deserves to have photos and stories curated,” she said.

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Sabine Weiss Obituary | Photography https://photo2000.co.uk/sabine-weiss-obituary-photography/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:20:00 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/sabine-weiss-obituary-photography/ Photographer Sabine Weiss, who died at the age of 97, established her considerable reputation within the French “humanist” school of black and white photography, which aimed to capture the universal human experience through images. of daily street life. Images like that of a horse kicking his heel, strapped to a snow-covered wasteland by the Paris […]]]>

Photographer Sabine Weiss, who died at the age of 97, established her considerable reputation within the French “humanist” school of black and white photography, which aimed to capture the universal human experience through images. of daily street life. Images like that of a horse kicking his heel, strapped to a snow-covered wasteland by the Paris flea market at the Porte de Vanves, or of a child illuminated only by a sparkler, are seen on a pedestal. ‘equality with those created by his friends and close to contemporaries Willy Ronis, Brassaï, Izis Bidermanas and Robert Doisneau, the latter of whom introduced him to his photo agency, Rapho, in 1952. However, throughout his long career, Weiss has worked through the medium, notably in advertising, travel and journalism.

She opened her studio on Boulevard Murat in Paris in 1950, facing another Swiss artist living in the city, Alberto Giacometti. Weiss always insisted that she was a craftswoman rather than an artist. First of all because, she says: “From the start, I had to make a living from photography. It was never just about art. However, she showed fine art even in advertising. His images of products such as cognac and perfume explored themes of evanescence and flight: perfume vaporizes from a well; a centaur flees the flames of flaming brandy.

Photograph by Sabine Weiss from 1952, Cheval, taken by the Paris flea market at Porte de Vanves. Photography: Sabine Weiss

Weiss also documented avant-garde creations, many of which became his friends. In music, they included Benjamin Britten, Stan Getz and Igor Stravinsky; in the fine arts, Jean Dubuffet, Fernand Léger, Robert Rauschenberg and Giacometti; the writers F Scott Fitzgerald, André Breton and Françoise Sagan; and actors such as Brigitte Bardot (whom she has photographed in exceptional colors) and Jeanne Moreau.

The Rapho agency has become the perfect outlet for his photojournalism and his personal work; she started out as one of only two women working for them. Her stories have been published in Vogue, Life, Paris Match, and the New York Times magazine, and she was included in the Postwar European Photography (1953) exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She took part in Edward Steichen’s groundbreaking exhibition The Family of Man, which began at MoMA in 1955 and toured for eight years in 38 different countries.

Brigitte Bardot
Brigitte Bardot in 1959, a first foray into color for Weiss. Photography: Sabine Weiss

Above all, Weiss loved to photograph children, with whom she had a special relationship, as shown in the books Poussettes, Charrettes et Roulettes (2000), Intimes Convictions (1989) and Des Enfants (2000). Their ability to play fascinates her, a favorite image being Children on Tree. Filmed in 1951, it depicts three boys struggling to balance themselves atop a thin winter tree; a younger boy tries to prop a metal bed against the slender trunk.

Born Sabine Weber in St-Gingolph, Switzerland, she fell in love with photography early on, buying her first Bakelite camera with her pocket money at the age of eight, and “printing” her images by displaying pictures. planks contact with the sun on the windowsill. Her first mentor was her father, a chemical engineer, who gave her, she told me in an interview for the Independent in 1987, “a very practical taste for the subject”, which was “a saving thing because I was always more visual than intellectual ”.

The Weber family moved to Geneva and, at the age of 15, Sabine seized for the first time the opportunity to exchange school for an apprenticeship in photography with François-Frédéric Boissonnas, 80 years old. Boissonnas, whose family had owned a photo studio almost since the invention of the camera, taught him composition and encouraged stylistic experimentation.

People dance while an accordion plays
Dance on a Sunday, Nazaré, Portugal, 1954. Photography: Sabine Weiss

In Geneva, Sabine meets the members of a French Jewish community in exile from Nazism. When the survivors returned to Paris in 1946, she also settled there. A contact introduced her to fashion photographer Willy Maywald, for whom she became a studio assistant: “I worked in unimaginable conditions today – no water or phone – but with him I understood the importance of natural light. Natural light as a source of emotion.

She stayed with him for four years, using his studio to design commercial work and his darkroom to start developing her own work. Fashion gave him access to “all of Paris”, Including the launch in 1947 by Christian Dior of his New Look.

In 1949, she met the American painter Hugh Weiss, who encouraged her to use color. Then, too, his fascination with line and form emerged, both in the visual framing of his images and in the rearrangements that could be achieved afterwards with the application of darkroom processes.

They married in 1950 and adopted a daughter, Marion. Weiss recalled it as a happy, personal and creative time when “a kind of national optimism” overcame the humiliation caused by the German occupation.

That year, she also started working with Armenian-Egyptian-French photographer Alban, traveling between studios in Brussels and Cairo, where the light inspired her to properly start working in color. During this time, she published a mix of reporting and travel reports from around the world in Vogue, Life, Holiday, Time and Picture Post.

During more than 60 additional years of photographic work, Weiss’ international reputation has steadily grown. Over 40 exhibition books and catalogs document his diverse interests, from local theater companies to artist monographs; Parisian markets and fairs for rural musicians; Country Profiles from Bulgaria to Burkina Faso.

A woman picking up a child at a lost and found counter
A 1955 photo of New York City. Weiss’s work included reporting and travel reports from around the world. Photography: Sabine Weiss

In 2017, she donated all of her archives to the Ēlysée Museum in Lausanne. In 2020, she won the Women in Motion photography award from Kering.

When I interviewed her, I met a warm and talkative woman, happy at home in the same studio she had moved into when it was a slum with no electricity or an indoor toilet. Remembering how so poor she was that she traded her portraits for vegetables at the local market, Weiss always looked back with gratitude and affection. She says it’s the people she has known through her photography that appeals to her the most, “whether it’s in the street markets, in famous galleries, or working in Printemps.”

Yet when I asked her why she thought her most reproduced non-commercial image was of the horse breaking free from its tether, she replied, “This one, to me, is a portrait of loneliness. My world, as a photographer, must be devoted to solitude. And that’s how I learned to love solitude like everything else.

Hugh died in 2007. Weiss is survived by Marion.

Sabine Weiss, photographer, born June 23, 1924; passed away on December 28, 2021

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Kader Attia challenges us to deal with trauma and loss https://photo2000.co.uk/kader-attia-challenges-us-to-deal-with-trauma-and-loss/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/kader-attia-challenges-us-to-deal-with-trauma-and-loss/ In 2009 he built Untitled (Ghardaïa), a replica of the old Algerian city of the same name made entirely of couscous. The work leads the viewer into the complex exchange between the Maghreb aesthetic heritage and its colonizers. At MoMA, in 2012, Attia exhibited Open your eyes (2010), a double-sided projection of archival images mainly […]]]>

In 2009 he built Untitled (Ghardaïa), a replica of the old Algerian city of the same name made entirely of couscous. The work leads the viewer into the complex exchange between the Maghreb aesthetic heritage and its colonizers. At MoMA, in 2012, Attia exhibited Open your eyes (2010), a double-sided projection of archival images mainly from Western museums. The juxtaposition of repaired artifacts and brutally wounded soldiers has sparked unexplored couples of anguish in the context of institutional criticism.

Often times, Attia rewards the viewer with knowledge, albeit obscured by graphic images, whether it is deformed body parts, amputated limbs, or just broken glasses. Through imagery that represents the irreversible reality of a rupture, he unveils potential avenues of redemption and salvation. And although it is often a difficult pill to swallow, the experience of an Attia work immediately transforms the viewer, leaving them with a lingering curiosity for more.

Silence in Phantom is a tribute to the whispering of Muslim prayers and the social policy of performing the prayer ritual en masse in a Western space. The encounter with the viewer, however, is vividly poetic, complemented by a comprehensive walk through the installation from another world. “When the individual body is connected to collective action, it produces a form of vibration – the physical and performative aspects of silence,” noted Attia.

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Wayne Thiebaud, famous pop art painter, dies at 101 https://photo2000.co.uk/wayne-thiebaud-famous-pop-art-painter-dies-at-101/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 00:25:21 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/wayne-thiebaud-famous-pop-art-painter-dies-at-101/ Wayne Thiebaud at the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art in 2016. Photo: Grégory Urquiaga Wayne Thiebaud, internationally known as the dean of West Coast figurative painters and also the originator of Pop art, died Saturday, December 25 in Sacramento, his primary residence since the 1950s. He was 101 years old. His […]]]>
Wayne Thiebaud at the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art in 2016. Photo: Grégory Urquiaga

Wayne Thiebaud, internationally known as the dean of West Coast figurative painters and also the originator of Pop art, died Saturday, December 25 in Sacramento, his primary residence since the 1950s. He was 101 years old.

His death was confirmed by his gallery, Acquavella.

“Even at 101, he spent most of his days in the studio, driven by, as he described it with his characteristic humility, ‘that almost neurotic fixation of trying to learn to paint,'” the gallery statement reads. .

Critics have attributed to Thiebaud (pronounced “Tee-bo”), among other things, the origin of Pop art and the extension of the lineage of Bay Area Figuration, the iconic style of the region.

“We have lost a legendary artist and a very close, kind and generous friend with the passing of Wayne Thiebaud,” Neal Benezra, director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, told The Chronicle. “Wayne has held a beloved place in our hearts and in our galleries for so long. He will be sadly missed by all of us. “

Thiebaud’s high-end paintings depicting food products, deli and bakery display cases, and ordinary items such as shoes and lipsticks became icons of late-20th-century American mass thirst for the fun and optimism. He just saw himself as a sort of daily columnist.

“Of course you are thankful when someone calls you something,” he once said. “But I never felt really involved. I have to say that I never really liked Pop art much.

“Untitled (cupcakes), 1999” by Wayne Thiebaud Photo: Berggruen Gallery

Instead, Thiebaud saw himself as belonging to longer, more cosmopolitan artistic traditions that placed little emphasis on stylistic labels or divisions between fine art and functional art. Illustrator and animator by training, he has an artisanal vision of pictorial creation and likes to reserve the term “art” only for the happiest performances of a practice essentially oriented towards the task: to paint a portrait, to describe an object, to stage , real or imaginary.

“I want to be able to paint anything I want at any time, the way I want to paint it,” he told The Chronicle in 2018. “I don’t want to develop a product or an image . “

Governor Gavin Newsom noted this style on Sunday. “From gumball machines to the landscapes of San Francisco, it has turned everyday life into an iconic statement of color and form,” the governor said in a statement. He called Thiebaud the “devoted Sacramentan” who gave back to Californians as an art teacher, saying, “Thiebaud was the pride of California and a great gift to the world.”

Thiebaud’s most widely viewed work included cover illustrations for the New Yorker and a 1994 drawing for a California license plate that implicitly identifies a car owner as a cultural insider.

But the fantastical landscapes of his mid-to-late career, inspired by San Francisco’s most hilly streets or by the patchwork of crisscrossed fields and meandering rivers of the Central Valley, play with perspective and allusive surface designs of San Francisco. ‘a way fully appreciated only by viewers familiar with modern art history.

Wayne Thiebaud saw the streets of San Francisco like no one else

The Street and the Shadow by Wayne Thiebaud, 1982-1983 (1996). Photo: Thiebaud, Wayne / Crocker Art Museum

“Streetscapes are among Thiebaud’s most abstract works,” said Charles Desmarais, retired visual art critic of Chronicle. “Looking at them gives us a better idea of ​​how his brain works and his understanding of form. This helps us to understand his most popular works like cakes and pies.

In 2001, the San Francisco Art Museums organized “Wayne Thiebaud: A Paintings Retrospective,” which traveled to museums in Texas, New York and Washington. DC The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art organized a career survey in 1985, and the Palm Springs Art Museum and San Jose Art Museum collaborated on another in 2009 and 2010.

Also in 2010, the Museo Morandi in Bologna, Italy, organized an exhibition, which later traveled to Vienna, which put Thiebaud’s still lifes alongside those of one of his artistic heroes, the painter and engraver Giorgio Morandi (1890-1964), whom he never met, but of whom he owned several works.

For his 100th anniversary last year, the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento and the Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco marked time with major exhibitions showcasing his work.

Of course, Wayne Thiebaud plans to paint for his 100th birthday

Meet Wayne Thiebaud as the painter celebrates his 100th birthday

Thiebaud curated paintings for the SFMOMA collection in September 2018. Photo: Liz Hafalia / The Chronicle 2018

Thiebaud specialist and friend John Berggruen, who learned of the news of Thiebaud’s passing on Sunday, December 26, while on vacation in Hawaii, said that “apart from his extraordinary talent and vision, he was perhaps the most gracious, charming, eloquent and inspiring personality. that I have never known.

Berggruen had shown Thiebaud’s work shortly after the John Berggruen Gallery opened in Union Square in 1970, one of the first of eight or nine solo exhibitions that consumed the entire gallery, he said.

“Every time we have presented a Thiebaud exhibit, there has been an enthusiastic response from customers, supporters and curators,” said Berggruen. “His work appealed to a lot of sensibilities. He had a very positive outlook on mundane and mundane matters, like pies and cakes. But beyond that, his sensitivity to the Californian landscape.

Over the past decade, the prices of Thiebaud’s large paintings, at auction and even in gallery exhibitions, have passed the seven-figure mark. A prolific printmaker who has often worked with the Crown Point Press in San Francisco, Thiebaud has also produced relatively affordable works in editions for decades.

Born Morton Wayne Thiebaud in Mesa, Arizona on November 15, 1920, Thiebaud grew up in Long Beach and Utah, where his father, an engineer and inventor, had moved the family during the Depression to engage in farming.

Thiebaud began drawing as a teenager while recovering from a crippling sports injury. While still attending Long Beach High School, he took commercial art classes and worked summers as an apprentice animator at Walt Disney Studios.

Military service during World War II interrupted the formal education Thiebaud had started at Long Beach Junior College (now Long Beach City College). From 1941 to 1945, he served in northern and southern California on military projects that used his graphic arts skills.

“I became an aircraft mechanic while waiting for pilot training. In the meantime, I found some guys who worked in cartoons and creating posters. I was amazed that such a thing exists in the service, ”he told The Chronicle in 2018.

Betty Jean Thiebaud and her husband Wayne Thiebaud Photo: Ray “Scotty” Morris / Special for The Chronicle

In 1943, he married Patricia Patterson, his first wife. They had two daughters, Twinka and Mallary Ann.

After divorcing Patterson in 1959, Thiebaud married Betty Jean Carr and helped raise her sons, Matthew and Mark Bult. The couple’s own son, Paul Thiebaud, who died of cancer at age 49 in 2010, created galleries in his name in San Francisco and New York that represented his father’s work. The family continues to operate the San Francisco site.

After periods of study at San Jose State College (now University) and California State College (now University) in Sacramento, Thiebaud began his own long and distinguished teaching career at Sacramento Junior (now City) College, while completing his Masters in Fine Arts. the.

He was also a longtime professor at UC Davis. HWe starred in what became a famous faculty of the art department which included Robert Arneson, William T. Wiley, Roy De Forest and Manuel Neri. He officially retired in 1991, but continued to teach one class per year.

“Teaching at university has become my education,” he said at the age of 98.

After a leave spent in Manhattan which put him in contact with the great painters and critics of the New York School, Thiebaud experienced his great career break in 1962, with a New York solo exhibition at the Allan Stone Gallery, an association successful it would continue until Stone’s death in 2006.

Thiebaud at SFMOMA in September 2018. Photo: Liz Hafalia / The Chronicle 2018

Thiebaud joined the art department at UC Davis in 1960 and taught there until 1990. Even after his retirement, he continued to teach there as a volunteer until 2002. During his tenure he received the UC Davis Award for Undergraduate Education and Academic Achievement, 1988; the UC Davis Medal, the university’s highest honor, in 1988; and the Chancellor’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Innovation, in 2016.

“Wayne Thiebaud has had a deep and lasting influence on our university, but his legacy transcends UC Davis,” UC Davis Chancellor Gary S. May said in a statement. “He was a brilliant artist and his work will forever encourage us to see our world in a more textured light, where common objects can reach deep and iconic heights. “

Thiebaud was a patron saint of the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Museum of Art at UC Davis, which opened in 1016.

“Wayne Thiebaud believed that teaching and learning were the most important activities in life,” said Rachel Teagle, Founding Director of Manetti Shrem. “He loved to read, chat and watch with his students. ”

Thiebaud has won numerous awards in recognition of his work as an artist and educator. These included election to the American Academy and the Institute of Arts and Letters, the Governor’s Lifetime Achievement in the Arts Award, and the National Medal of the Arts. He has received honorary doctorates from Dickinson College, the San Francisco Art Institute, the Art Institute of Southern California, and California State University Sacramento.

Thiebaud is survived by his daughters, Twinka Thiebaud and Mallary Ann Thiebaud, from his first marriage; son, Matt Bult, from his second marriage; and six grandchildren.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



  • Sam Whiting and Kenneth Baker


    Sam Whiting and Kenneth Baker

    Sam Whiting is a writer for the San Francisco Chronicle, and Kenneth Baker, who died this year, was a former visual art critic at The Chronicle.

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Escape your comfort zone: I only dance while intoxicated or alone. Can I face my fears and jerk off sober? | To dance https://photo2000.co.uk/escape-your-comfort-zone-i-only-dance-while-intoxicated-or-alone-can-i-face-my-fears-and-jerk-off-sober-to-dance/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://photo2000.co.uk/escape-your-comfort-zone-i-only-dance-while-intoxicated-or-alone-can-i-face-my-fears-and-jerk-off-sober-to-dance/ We are all programmed to dance, says Janette Manrara. “Babies can’t walk, they can’t talk, but put on a song and they start to wobble. One of the first things she did, growing up with a Cuban family in Miami, was stand on her father’s feet when he danced salsa. You probably know Manrara for […]]]>

We are all programmed to dance, says Janette Manrara. “Babies can’t walk, they can’t talk, but put on a song and they start to wobble. One of the first things she did, growing up with a Cuban family in Miami, was stand on her father’s feet when he danced salsa.

You probably know Manrara for her role as a professional dancer in Strictly Come Dancing and for presenting her companion show, It Takes Two. She’s the real deal, and she’ll teach me how to dance.

Somewhere in me I know what it means to be programmed. Music is important to me, and when it’s the right kind of music, I feel the need to get on with it. But I haven’t made much progress beyond the oscillation phase. I never really felt comfortable – even comfortable – on the dance floor. The odds aren’t exactly in my favor: I’m a gangly, introverted Englishman, now 56 – maybe it’s okay to throw in the towel on this one and accept my place as a wilted wallflower.

But the problem is less the shape or age of my body, the more what’s going on in my head. It is about self-awareness and self-confidence, respectively too much and too little. I love to dance, but I worry about how I look when I do and what other people think. That’s why I usually only do this when I’m drunk. Or all alone. Often both in fact.

And right now, I’m neither. It’s noon, we’re in a bright dance studio in Fulham, West London, and it scares me. There are mirrors all the way up a wall – that’s not going to help self-awareness. It’s also a constant reminder of how much I am not alone. It’s not even just me and Manrara – Lucy from the BBC commercial is there, as is photographer David the Guardian, with all his stuff. “Forget he’s here,” Manrara said. “Dancing is not showing yourself, it is feeling a certain way, and as soon as you realize that you are not doing it for anyone other than yourself, you will look good dancing and you will appreciate it. “

We start with a little warm-up: jerking, loosening, head down, after which Manrara says I seem to have good self-awareness and I get a festive double punch. Now she’s going to teach me the basics of salsa. “Because salsa is the least technical, you don’t have to think much, as long as you can keep up with the timing. So don’t aim too high.

The steps I’m learning are less like the standard Latin dance moves you see on Strictly, but more like something you might see at a family party in Cuba. I’m happy ; take me to the family reunion in Cuba. “It’s not a performance,” she said.

First without music, she shows me: move forward, backward, close feet, backward, forward, close feet. Now, lifting your feet a little, oops, no, like that. Next to the right and to the left, the legs bent a little, less stiff, less like a salsa-robot.

‘Dancing is not showing off’ … Sam Wollaston with Janette Manrara. Photography: David Levene / The Guardian

What about my arms? I never know what to do with my arms. “Imagine playing the drums with your hands in front, elbows outward, and your hands going opposite your feet. And move your hips. She wiggles her hips, like a slalom skier. I stir mine, like a stumbling drunk. Hips don’t lie. But I think they can wait; no baby and all that.

Manrara then puts on salsa music, loud, but not loud enough to cover my inhibitions. Now she’s in front of me: “Don’t look down, or you’ll step on my feet,” she said. Where to look then? I’m not ready for eye contact; I sit over his shoulder.

OK, okay, it’s not that bad. But it’s a pretty special routine that Manrara taught me and that I was able to follow. But I also want to be confident, you know, just dancing, at a club (unlikely, these days, to be honest), at a wedding, maybe, daddy dancing to I Will Survive, Staying Alive or Thriller. .

“There is no right or wrong, it’s about letting go. When a song comes along that you like, forget who’s around, it’s about you; just be Sam. What’s your favorite song? ”My God, my favorite song, so…“ Your favorite style of music, so? ”Uh, I really like reggae? She puts on Can You Be Loved by Bob Marley and me said to close my eyes and relax.

That – with closed eyes – is a good thing. I’m not in a bright studio with a famous dancer on TV and a photographer from a national newspaper, I’m in a beach bar… Don’t let them change you, oh! Or even reorganize yourself! Oh no! And I’m starting to wobble, in a good way – well, in my own way, I don’t care if it’s good or not, remember? I still don’t know what to do with my arms …

“Put them in place!” Manrara said. What, in the air? I don’t think I’m doing that… well, maybe once, in Ibiza in 1987, but I’m not really the “hands up” type. So I wave them just a little – but then I hear David click with his camera, and I remember where I am and why I’m here, and that kind of ruins the moment.

Still, I get a double high five, and guess what: Manrara says I have a natural internal rhythm! Ha! Obviously she tells everyone, but I take it.

Anyway, back to salsa, and she wants to try one more thing. Remember the step: forward, back, closed feet, back, forward, closed feet, then sideways, sideways. But now she takes my hands … And it makes me embarrassed again. I should have mentioned the operation on my hand that I had a few weeks ago, the new scar. It might sound a bit odd and rough – is that why she recoils in horror? She doesn’t back down in horror, though – she’s going around in circles! Loosen your grip, she said. I see, to make us less sinuous, less like a wet towel being wrung out.

She turns again, this time with more success. I’m not gonna lie, I feel a little happy with myself, not that I have much to do with it. This leads to more kudos and a double high fives. “Own your length!” Manrara tells me. What does it mean? “It’s not being cocky or arrogant or thinking you’re the best when you walk into a room; it’s about loving and kissing you all. Own!”

Included: owns my length. And I have to promise to go out and dance more often. “Because it is truly a medicine for the soul and will confidently help you in all aspects of your life. Great, I think I’m the one who got healed then. As of today, no one is putting Sam around.

Janette Manrara hosts the Strictly Come Dancing Live UK Arena Tour, from January 20 to February 13.

Tickets are available on strictlycomedancinglive.com

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